add new comparison method rgb_difference that resembles arithmetical difference per...
[imager.git] / lib / Imager / Filters.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 Imager::Filters - Entire Image Filtering Operations
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7   use Imager;
8
9   $img = ...;
10
11   $img->filter(type=>'autolevels');
12   $img->filter(type=>'autolevels', lsat=>0.2);
13   $img->filter(type=>'turbnoise')
14
15   # and lots of others
16
17   load_plugin("dynfilt/dyntest.so")
18     or die "unable to load plugin\n";
19
20   $img->filter(type=>'lin_stretch', a=>35, b=>200);
21
22   unload_plugin("dynfilt/dyntest.so")
23     or die "unable to load plugin\n";
24
25   $out = $img->difference(other=>$other_img);
26
27 =head1 DESCRIPTION
28
29 Filters are operations that have similar calling interface.
30
31 =over
32
33 =item filter()
34
35 Parameters:
36
37 =over
38
39 =item *
40
41 type - the type of filter, see L</Types of Filters>.
42
43 =item *
44
45 many other possible parameters, see L</Types of Filters> below.
46
47 =back
48
49 Returns the invocant (C<$self>) on success, returns a false value on
50 failure.  You can call C<< $self->errstr >> to determine the cause of
51 the failure.
52
53   $self->filter(type => $type, ...)
54     or die $self->errstr;
55
56 =back
57
58 =head2 Types of Filters
59
60 Here is a list of the filters that are always available in Imager.
61 This list can be obtained by running the C<filterlist.perl> script
62 that comes with the module source.
63
64   Filter          Arguments   Default value
65   autolevels      lsat        0.1
66                   usat        0.1
67
68   autolevels_skew lsat        0.1
69                   usat        0.1
70                   skew        0
71
72   bumpmap         bump lightx lighty
73                   elevation   0
74                   st          2
75
76   bumpmap_complex bump
77                   channel     0
78                   tx          0
79                   ty          0
80                   Lx          0.2
81                   Ly          0.4
82                   Lz          -1 
83                   cd          1.0 
84                   cs          40.0
85                   n           1.3
86                   Ia          (0 0 0)
87                   Il          (255 255 255)
88                   Is          (255 255 255)
89
90   contrast        intensity
91
92   conv            coef
93
94   fountain        xa ya xb yb
95                   ftype        linear
96                   repeat       none
97                   combine      none
98                   super_sample none
99                   ssample_param 4
100                   segments(see below)
101
102   gaussian        stddev
103
104   gaussian2       stddevX
105                   stddevY
106
107   gradgen         xo yo colors 
108                   dist         0
109
110   hardinvert
111
112   hardinvertall
113
114   mosaic          size         20
115
116   noise           amount       3
117                   subtype      0
118
119   postlevels      levels       10
120
121   radnoise        xo           100
122                   yo           100
123                   ascale       17.0
124                   rscale       0.02
125
126   turbnoise       xo           0.0
127                   yo           0.0
128                   scale        10.0
129
130   unsharpmask     stddev       2.0
131                   scale        1.0
132
133   watermark       wmark
134                   pixdiff      10
135                   tx           0
136                   ty           0
137
138 All parameters must have some value but if a parameter has a default
139 value it may be omitted when calling the filter function.
140
141 Every one of these filters modifies the image in place.
142
143 If none of the filters here do what you need, the
144 L<Imager::Engines/transform()> or L<Imager::Engines/transform2()>
145 function may be useful.
146
147 =for stopwords
148 autolevels bumpmap bumpmap_complex conv gaussian hardinvert hardinvertall
149 radnoise turbnoise unsharpmask gradgen postlevels
150
151 A reference of the filters follows:
152
153 =over
154
155 =item C<autolevels>
156
157 Scales the luminance of the image so that the luminance will cover
158 the possible range for the image.  C<lsat> and C<usat> truncate the
159 range by the specified fraction at the top and bottom of the range
160 respectively.
161
162   # increase contrast, losing little detail
163   $img->filter(type=>"autolevels")
164     or die $img->errstr;
165
166 The method used here is typically called L<Histogram
167 Equalization|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histogram_equalization>.
168
169 =item C<autolevels_skew>
170
171 Scales the value of each channel so that the values in the image will
172 cover the whole possible range for the channel.  C<lsat> and C<usat>
173 truncate the range by the specified fraction at the top and bottom of
174 the range respectively.
175
176   # increase contrast per channel, losing little detail
177   $img->filter(type=>"autolevels_skew")
178     or die $img->errstr;
179
180   # increase contrast, losing 20% of highlight at top and bottom range
181   $img->filter(type=>"autolevels", lsat=>0.2, usat=>0.2)
182     or die $img->errstr;
183
184 This filter was the original C<autolevels> filter, but it's typically
185 useless due to the significant color skew it can produce.
186
187 =item C<bumpmap>
188
189 uses the channel C<elevation> image C<bump> as a bump map on your
190 image, with the light at (C<lightx>, C<lightty>), with a shadow length
191 of C<st>.
192
193   $img->filter(type=>"bumpmap", bump=>$bumpmap_img,
194                lightx=>10, lighty=>10, st=>5)
195     or die $img->errstr;
196
197 =item C<bumpmap_complex>
198
199 uses the channel C<channel> image C<bump> as a bump map on your image.
200 If C<< Lz < 0 >> the three L parameters are considered to be the
201 direction of the light.  If C<< Lz > 0 >> the L parameters are
202 considered to be the light position.  C<Ia> is the ambient color,
203 C<Il> is the light color, C<Is> is the color of specular highlights.
204 C<cd> is the diffuse coefficient and C<cs> is the specular
205 coefficient.  C<n> is the shininess of the surface.
206
207   $img->filter(type=>"bumpmap_complex", bump=>$bumpmap_img)
208     or die $img->errstr;
209
210 =item C<contrast>
211
212 scales each channel by C<intensity>.  Values of C<intensity> < 1.0
213 will reduce the contrast.
214
215   # higher contrast
216   $img->filter(type=>"contrast", intensity=>1.3)
217     or die $img->errstr;
218
219   # lower contrast
220   $img->filter(type=>"contrast", intensity=>0.8)
221     or die $img->errstr;
222
223 =item C<conv>
224
225 performs 2 1-dimensional convolutions on the image using the values
226 from C<coef>.  C<coef> should be have an odd length and the sum of the
227 coefficients must be non-zero.
228
229   # sharper
230   $img->filter(type=>"conv", coef=>[-0.5, 2, -0.5 ])
231     or die $img->errstr;
232
233   # blur
234   $img->filter(type=>"conv", coef=>[ 1, 2, 1 ])
235     or die $img->errstr;
236
237   # error
238   $img->filter(type=>"conv", coef=>[ -0.5, 1, -0.5 ])
239     or die $img->errstr;
240
241 =item C<fountain>
242
243 renders a fountain fill, similar to the gradient tool in most paint
244 software.  The default fill is a linear fill from opaque black to
245 opaque white.  The points C<A(Cxa, ya)> and C<B(xb, yb)> control the
246 way the fill is performed, depending on the C<ftype> parameter:
247
248 =for stopwords ramping
249
250 =over
251
252 =item C<linear>
253
254 the fill ramps from A through to B.
255
256 =item C<bilinear>
257
258 the fill ramps in both directions from A, where AB defines the length
259 of the gradient.
260
261 =item C<radial>
262
263 A is the center of a circle, and B is a point on it's circumference.
264 The fill ramps from the center out to the circumference.
265
266 =item C<radial_square>
267
268 A is the center of a square and B is the center of one of it's sides.
269 This can be used to rotate the square.  The fill ramps out to the
270 edges of the square.
271
272 =item C<revolution>
273
274 A is the center of a circle and B is a point on its circumference.  B
275 marks the 0 and 360 point on the circle, with the fill ramping
276 clockwise.
277
278 =item C<conical>
279
280 A is the center of a circle and B is a point on it's circumference.  B
281 marks the 0 and point on the circle, with the fill ramping in both
282 directions to meet opposite.
283
284 =back
285
286 The C<repeat> option controls how the fill is repeated for some
287 C<ftype>s after it leaves the AB range:
288
289 =over
290
291 =item C<none>
292
293 no repeats, points outside of each range are treated as if they were
294 on the extreme end of that range.
295
296 =item C<sawtooth>
297
298 the fill simply repeats in the positive direction
299
300 =item C<triangle>
301
302 the fill repeats in reverse and then forward and so on, in the
303 positive direction
304
305 =item C<saw_both>
306
307 the fill repeats in both the positive and negative directions (only
308 meaningful for a linear fill).
309
310 =item C<tri_both>
311
312 as for triangle, but in the negative direction too (only meaningful
313 for a linear fill).
314
315 =back
316
317 By default the fill simply overwrites the whole image (unless you have
318 parts of the range 0 through 1 that aren't covered by a segment), if
319 any segments of your fill have any transparency, you can set the
320 I<combine> option to 'normal' to have the fill combined with the
321 existing pixels.  See the description of I<combine> in L<Imager::Fill>.
322
323 If your fill has sharp edges, for example between steps if you use
324 repeat set to 'triangle', you may see some aliased or ragged edges.
325 You can enable super-sampling which will take extra samples within the
326 pixel in an attempt anti-alias the fill.
327
328 The possible values for the super_sample option are:
329
330 =over
331
332 =item C<none>
333
334 no super-sampling is done
335
336 =item C<grid>
337
338 a square grid of points are sampled.  The number of points sampled is
339 the square of ceil(0.5 + sqrt(ssample_param)).
340
341 =item C<random>
342
343 a random set of points within the pixel are sampled.  This looks
344 pretty bad for low ssample_param values.
345
346 =item C<circle>
347
348 the points on the radius of a circle within the pixel are sampled.
349 This seems to produce the best results, but is fairly slow (for now).
350
351 =back
352
353 You can control the level of sampling by setting the ssample_param
354 option.  This is roughly the number of points sampled, but depends on
355 the type of sampling.
356
357 The segments option is an arrayref of segments.  You really should use
358 the L<Imager::Fountain> class to build your fountain fill.  Each
359 segment is an array ref containing:
360
361 =over
362
363 =item C<start>
364
365 a floating point number between 0 and 1, the start of the range of
366 fill parameters covered by this segment.
367
368 =item C<middle>
369
370 a floating point number between start and end which can be used to
371 push the color range towards one end of the segment.
372
373 =item C<end>
374
375 a floating point number between 0 and 1, the end of the range of fill
376 parameters covered by this segment.  This should be greater than
377 start.
378
379 =item C<c0>
380
381 =item C<c1>
382
383 The colors at each end of the segment.  These can be either
384 Imager::Color or Imager::Color::Float objects.
385
386 =item segment type
387
388 The type of segment, this controls the way the fill parameter varies
389 over the segment. 0 for linear, 1 for curved (unimplemented), 2 for
390 sine, 3 for sphere increasing, 4 for sphere decreasing.
391
392 =item color type
393
394 The way the color varies within the segment, 0 for simple RGB, 1 for
395 hue increasing and 2 for hue decreasing.
396
397 =back
398
399 Don't forget to use Imager::Fountain instead of building your own.
400 Really.  It even loads GIMP gradient files.
401
402   # build the gradient the hard way - linear from black to white,
403   # then back again
404   my @simple =
405    (
406      [   0, 0.25, 0.5, 'black', 'white', 0, 0 ],
407      [ 0.5. 0.75, 1.0, 'white', 'black', 0, 0 ],
408    );
409   # across
410   my $linear = $img->copy;
411   $linear->filter(type     => "fountain",
412                   ftype    => 'linear',
413                   repeat   => 'sawtooth',
414                   segments => \@simple,
415                   xa       => 0,
416                   ya       => $linear->getheight / 2,
417                   xb       => $linear->getwidth - 1,
418                   yb       => $linear->getheight / 2)
419     or die $linear->errstr;
420   # around
421   my $revolution = $img->copy;
422   $revolution->filter(type     => "fountain",
423                       ftype    => 'revolution',
424                       segments => \@simple,
425                       xa       => $revolution->getwidth / 2,
426                       ya       => $revolution->getheight / 2,
427                       xb       => $revolution->getwidth / 2,
428                       yb       => 0)
429     or die $revolution->errstr;
430   # out from the middle
431   my $radial = $img->copy;
432   $radial->filter(type     => "fountain",
433                   ftype    => 'radial',
434                   segments => \@simple,
435                   xa       => $im->getwidth / 2,
436                   ya       => $im->getheight / 2,
437                   xb       => $im->getwidth / 2,
438                   yb       => 0)
439     or die $radial->errstr;
440
441 =for stopwords Gaussian
442
443 =item C<gaussian>
444
445 performs a Gaussian blur of the image, using C<stddev> as the standard
446 deviation of the curve used to combine pixels, larger values give
447 bigger blurs.  For a definition of Gaussian Blur, see:
448
449   http://www.maths.abdn.ac.uk/~igc/tch/mx4002/notes/node99.html
450
451 Values of C<stddev> around 0.5 provide a barely noticeable blur,
452 values around 5 provide a very strong blur.
453
454   # only slightly blurred
455   $img->filter(type=>"gaussian", stddev=>0.5)
456     or die $img->errstr;
457
458   # more strongly blurred
459   $img->filter(type=>"gaussian", stddev=>5)
460     or die $img->errstr;
461
462 =item C<gaussian2>
463
464 performs a Gaussian blur of the image, using C<stddevX>, C<stddevY> as the
465 standard deviation of the curve used to combine pixels on the X and Y axis,
466 respectively. Larger values give bigger blurs.  For a definition of Gaussian
467 Blur, see:
468
469   http://www.maths.abdn.ac.uk/~igc/tch/mx4002/notes/node99.html
470
471 Values of C<stddevX> or C<stddevY> around 0.5 provide a barely noticeable blur,
472 values around 5 provide a very strong blur.
473
474   # only slightly blurred
475   $img->filter(type=>"gaussian2", stddevX=>0.5, stddevY=>0.5)
476     or die $img->errstr;
477
478   # blur an image in the Y axis
479   $img->filter(type=>"gaussian", stddevX=>0, stddevY=>5 )
480     or die $img->errstr;
481
482 =item C<gradgen>
483
484 renders a gradient, with the given I<colors> at the corresponding
485 points (x,y) in C<xo> and C<yo>.  You can specify the way distance is
486 measured for color blending by setting C<dist> to 0 for Euclidean, 1
487 for Euclidean squared, and 2 for Manhattan distance.
488
489   $img->filter(type="gradgen", 
490                xo=>[ 10, 50, 10 ], 
491                yo=>[ 10, 50, 50 ],
492                colors=>[ qw(red blue green) ]);
493
494 =item C<hardinvert>
495 X<filters, hardinvert>X<hardinvert>
496
497 inverts the image, black to white, white to black.  All color channels
498 are inverted, excluding the alpha channel if any.
499
500   $img->filter(type=>"hardinvert")
501     or die $img->errstr;
502
503 =item C<hardinvertall>
504 X<filters, hardinvertall>X<hardinvertall>
505
506 inverts the image, black to white, white to black.  All channels are
507 inverted, including the alpha channel if any.
508
509   $img->filter(type=>"hardinvertall")
510     or die $img->errstr;
511
512 =item C<mosaic>
513
514 produces averaged tiles of the given C<size>.
515
516   $img->filter(type=>"mosaic", size=>5)
517     or die $img->errstr;
518
519 =item C<noise>
520
521 adds noise of the given C<amount> to the image.  If C<subtype> is
522 zero, the noise is even to each channel, otherwise noise is added to
523 each channel independently.
524
525   # monochrome noise
526   $img->filter(type=>"noise", amount=>20, subtype=>0)
527     or die $img->errstr;
528
529   # color noise
530   $img->filter(type=>"noise", amount=>20, subtype=>1)
531     or die $img->errstr;
532
533 =for stopwords Perlin
534
535 =item C<radnoise>
536
537 renders radiant Perlin turbulent noise.  The center of the noise is at
538 (C<xo>, C<yo>), C<ascale> controls the angular scale of the noise ,
539 and C<rscale> the radial scale, higher numbers give more detail.
540
541   $img->filter(type=>"radnoise", xo=>50, yo=>50,
542                ascale=>1, rscale=>0.02)
543     or die $img->errstr;
544
545 =item C<postlevels>
546
547 alters the image to have only C<levels> distinct level in each
548 channel.
549
550   $img->filter(type=>"postlevels", levels=>10)
551     or die $img->errstr;
552
553 =item C<turbnoise>
554
555 renders Perlin turbulent noise.  (C<xo>, C<yo>) controls the origin of
556 the noise, and C<scale> the scale of the noise, with lower numbers
557 giving more detail.
558
559   $img->filter(type=>"turbnoise", xo=>10, yo=>10, scale=>10)
560     or die $img->errstr;
561
562 =for stopwords unsharp
563
564 =item C<unsharpmask>
565
566 performs an unsharp mask on the image.  This increases the contrast of
567 edges in the image.
568
569 This is the result of subtracting a Gaussian blurred version of the
570 image from the original.  C<stddev> controls the C<stddev> parameter
571 of the Gaussian blur.  Each output pixel is:
572
573   in + scale * (in - blurred)
574
575 eg.
576
577   $img->filter(type=>"unsharpmask", stddev=>1, scale=>0.5)
578     or die $img->errstr;
579
580 C<unsharpmark> has the following parameters:
581
582 =for stopwords GIMP GIMP's
583
584 =over
585
586 =item *
587
588 C<stddev> - this is equivalent to the C<Radius> value in the GIMP's
589 unsharp mask filter.  This controls the size of the contrast increase
590 around edges, larger values will remove fine detail. You should
591 probably experiment on the types of images you plan to work with.
592 Default: 2.0.
593
594 =item *
595
596 C<scale> - controls the strength of the edge enhancement, equivalent
597 to I<Amount> in the GIMP's unsharp mask filter.  Default: 1.0.
598
599 =back
600
601 =item C<watermark>
602
603 applies C<wmark> as a watermark on the image with strength C<pixdiff>,
604 with an origin at (C<tx>, C<ty>)
605
606   $img->filter(type=>"watermark", tx=>10, ty=>50, 
607                wmark=>$wmark_image, pixdiff=>50)
608     or die $img->errstr;
609
610 =back
611
612 A demonstration of most of the filters can be found at:
613
614   http://www.develop-help.com/imager/filters.html
615
616 =head2 External Filters
617
618 As of Imager 0.48 you can create perl or XS based filters and hook
619 them into Imager's filter() method:
620
621 =over
622
623 =item register_filter()
624
625 Registers a filter so it is visible via Imager's filter() method.
626
627   Imager->register_filter(type => 'your_filter',
628                           defaults => { parm1 => 'default1' },
629                           callseq => [ qw/image parm1/ ],
630                           callsub => \&your_filter);
631   $img->filter(type=>'your_filter', parm1 => 'something');
632
633 The following parameters are needed:
634
635 =over
636
637 =item *
638
639 C<type> - the type value that will be supplied to filter() to use your
640 filter.
641
642 =item *
643
644 C<defaults> - a hash of defaults for the filter's parameters
645
646 =item *
647
648 C<callseq> - a reference to an array of required parameter names.
649
650 =item *
651
652 C<callsub> - a code reference called to execute your filter.  The
653 parameters passed to filter() are supplied as a list of parameter
654 name, value ... which can be assigned to a hash.
655
656 The special parameters C<image> and C<imager> are supplied as the low
657 level image object from $self and $self itself respectively.
658
659 The function you supply must modify the image in place.
660
661 To indicate an error, die with an error message followed by a
662 newline. C<filter()> will store the error message as the C<errstr()>
663 for the invocant and return false to indicate failure.
664
665   sub my_filter {
666     my %opts = @_;
667     _is_valid($opts{myparam})
668       or die "myparam invalid!\n";
669
670     # actually do the filtering...
671   }
672
673 =back
674
675 See L<Imager::Filter::Mandelbrot> for an example.
676
677 =back
678
679 =for stopwords DSOs
680
681 =head2 Plug-ins
682
683 The plug in interface is deprecated.  Please use the Imager API, see
684 L<Imager::API> and L</External Filters> for details
685
686 It is possible to add filters to the module without recompiling Imager
687 itself.  This is done by using DSOs (Dynamic shared object) available
688 on most systems.  This way you can maintain your own filters and not
689 have to have it added to Imager, or worse patch every new version of
690 Imager.  Modules can be loaded AND UNLOADED at run time.  This means
691 that you can have a server/daemon thingy that can do something like:
692
693   load_plugin("dynfilt/dyntest.so")
694     or die "unable to load plugin\n";
695
696   $img->filter(type=>'lin_stretch', a=>35, b=>200);
697
698   unload_plugin("dynfilt/dyntest.so")
699     or die "unable to load plugin\n";
700
701 Someone decides that the filter is not working as it should -
702 F<dyntest.c> can be modified and recompiled, and then reloaded:
703
704   load_plugin("dynfilt/dyntest.so")
705     or die "unable to load plugin\n";
706
707   $img->filter(%hsh);
708
709 =for stopwords Linux Solaris HPUX OpenBSD FreeBSD TRU64 OSF1 AIX Win32 OS X
710
711 Note: This has been tested successfully on the following systems:
712 Linux, Solaris, HPUX, OpenBSD, FreeBSD, TRU64/OSF1, AIX, Win32, OS X.
713
714 =over
715
716 =item load_plugin()
717
718 This is a function, not a method, exported by default.  You should
719 import this function explicitly for future compatibility if you need
720 it.
721
722 Accepts a single parameter, the name of a shared library file to load.
723
724 Returns true on success.  Check Imager->errstr on failure.
725
726 =item unload_plugin()
727
728 This is a function, not a method, which is exported by default.  You
729 should import this function explicitly for future compatibility if you
730 need it.
731
732 Accepts a single parameter, the name of a shared library to unload.
733 This library must have been previously loaded by load_plugin().
734
735 Returns true on success.  Check Imager->errstr on failure.
736
737 =back
738
739 A few example plug-ins are included and built (but not installed):
740
741 =over
742
743 =item *
744
745 F<plugins/dyntest.c> - provides the C<null> (no action) filter, and
746 C<lin_stretch> filters.  C<lin_stretch> stretches sample values
747 between C<a> and C<b> out to the full sample range.
748
749 =item *
750
751 F<plugins/dt2.c> - provides the C<html_art> filter that writes the
752 image to the HTML fragment file supplied in C<fname> as a HTML table.
753
754 =item *
755
756 F<plugins/flines.c> - provides the C<flines> filter that dims
757 alternate lines to emulate an old CRT display.
758 L<Imager::Filter::Flines> provides the same functionality.
759
760 =item *
761
762 F<plugins/mandelbrot.c> - provides the C<mandelbrot> filter that
763 renders the Mandelbrot set within the given range of x [-2, 0.5) and y
764 [-1.25, 1,25).  L<Imager::Filter::Mandelbrot> provides a more flexible
765 Mandelbrot set renderer.
766
767 =back
768
769 =head2 Image Difference
770
771 =over
772
773 =item difference()
774
775 You can create a new image that is the difference between 2 other images.
776
777   my $diff = $img->difference(other=>$other_img);
778
779 For each pixel in $img that is different to the pixel in $other_img,
780 the pixel from $other_img is given, otherwise the pixel is transparent
781 black.
782
783 This can be used for debugging image differences ("Where are they
784 different?"), and for optimizing animated GIFs.
785
786 Note that $img and $other_img must have the same number of channels.
787 The width and height of $diff will be the minimum of each of the width
788 and height of $img and $other_img.
789
790 Parameters:
791
792 =over
793
794 =item *
795
796 C<other> - the other image object to compare against
797
798 =item *
799
800 C<mindist> - the difference between corresponding samples must be
801 greater than C<mindist> for the pixel to be considered different.  So
802 a value of zero returns all different pixels, not all pixels.  Range:
803 0 to 255 inclusive.  Default: 0.
804
805 For large sample images this is scaled down to the range 0 .. 1.
806
807 =back
808
809 =back
810
811 =item rgb_difference()
812
813 You can create a new image that is the difference between 2 other images.
814
815   my $diff = $img->rgb_difference(other=>$other_img);
816
817 For each pixel in $img that is different to the pixel in $other_img,
818 the arithmetic difference for the value of the pixel in $img from
819 $other_img per color is given. Transparency is ignored.
820
821 This can be used for measuring image differences ("How much are they
822 different?").
823
824 Note that $img and $other_img must have the same number of channels.
825 The width and height of $diff will be the minimum of each of the width
826 and height of $img and $other_img.
827
828 Parameters:
829
830 =over
831
832 =item *
833
834 C<other> - the other image object to compare against
835
836 =back
837
838 =back
839
840 =head1 AUTHOR
841
842 Arnar M. Hrafnkelsson, Tony Cook <tonyc@cpan.org>.
843
844 =head1 SEE ALSO
845
846 Imager, Imager::Filter::Flines, Imager::Filter::Mandelbrot
847
848 =head1 REVISION
849
850 $Revision$
851
852 =cut